THE DOG LOT

EDUCATIONAL MATERIAL FOR THE YOUNGEST LEVEL

The dog lot is one of 9 podcasts produced for the Icefjord Centre in Ilulissat by Katrine Nyland.

BOOK CREATOR AS A TEACHING TOOL

The Dog Lot is a student’s book associated with the podcast The Dog Lot. The duration of the podcast is 5:38 minutes.

The activities have been designed to focus on the investigative, experimental, and creative approach of the students to learning. The process consists of three steps:

  • Preparation before listening to the podcast
  • Listening to and working with the podcast
  • Further work with topics and insights from the podcast

We recommend that you listen to the podcast before presenting it to the students.

ABOUT THE MATERIAL

We recommend that students work in pairs or individually. Depending on what suits each student best and the competences to be developed. Keep in mind that your best friend is not necessarily the one you collaborate best with. Working together is about working together and not just being together.

Nature/culture/technology

Cross-curricular – languages and science

  • Students acquire a fundamental knowledge of the sled dog and its importance for humans at the Icefjord.
  • They practise their skills in communication and collaboration.
  • They obtain an understanding of the importance of ice for life around the Icefjord.

BOOK CREATOR AS A TEACHING TOOL

The Dog Lot is a student’s book associated with the podcast The Dog Lot. The duration of the podcast is 5:38 minutes.

The activities have been designed to focus on the investigative, experimental, and creative approach of the students to learning. The process consists of three steps:

  • Preparation before listening to the podcast
  • Listening to and working with the podcast
  • Further work with topics and insights from the podcast

We recommend that you listen to the podcast before presenting it to the students.

ABOUT THE MATERIAL

We recommend that students work in pairs or individually. Depending on what suits each student best and the competences to be developed. Keep in mind that your best friend is not necessarily the one you collaborate best with. Working together is about working together and not just being together.

Nature/culture/technology

Cross-curricular – languages and science

  • Students acquire a fundamental knowledge of the sled dog and its importance for humans at the Icefjord.
  • They practise their skills in communication and collaboration.
  • They obtain an understanding of the importance of ice for life around the Icefjord.
00:00
00:00

The dog lot

PAGE BY PAGE GUIDE – THE BOOK CREATOR STUDENT’S BOOK “THE DOG LOT” 

The students meet the Icefjord Centre in two pictures, showing respectively summer and winter.

In the classroom you can talk about:

  • What the Icefjord Centre is.
  • What it looks like around the centre.
  • The difference between summer and winter.
  • How summer and winter differs where you live.

The students see a map of Greenland. A marker indicates where Ilulissat is located.

In class you can talk about:

  • What you see on the map.
  • How many people are living in Ilulissat.
  • What else you know about Greenland and Ilulissat.
  • Do you know the names of other places on the map?
  •  

The students see part of a world map. The job now is to move the red marker down to the map to show where each student lives. The marker is found in the white box and can be drawn into the map.

In class you can talk about:

  • Where your hometown is located.
  • How many people are living there.
  • Do you know the names of other places on the map?

Now it is time for the students to listen to the podcast The Dog Lot. They start the podcast by clicking on the icon in the middle of page 12.

It is recommended that they listen in pairs or small groups.

Let the students spend some minutes talking to the one next to them about what they just heard.

On page 13 the students will make short sound recordings telling about the podcast. The pictures on the page may help them remember what they heard.

This is how to make a sound recording in Book Creator, web version:

  1. Click on +
  2. Choose Record
  3. Click on Start recording
  4. Start talking
  5. Click on Stop recording
  6. Choose USE RECORDING

And in the Book Creator app:

  1. Tap  + 
  2. Tap Media (if necessary)
  3. Tap Add Sound 
  4. Tap Start recording
  5. Start talking
  6. Tap Stop recording
  7. Choose Yes

The recording will now be represented by a small sound icon. This icon can be placed where you wish on the page. You can listen to the recording over and over again.

Review in class

It is recommended to have a joint discussion in class when working with pages 12-13 is finished. We suggest that you support this with writing and maybe illustrating concepts and keywords on the blackboard. You could talk about:

  • What surprised the students when listening to the podcast.
  • Concepts and keywords that the students encountered in the podcast. You may find inspiration for the conversation below.

Concepts and keywords

  • Culture
    Culture consists of all the values, habits, traditions, knowledge and attitudes which characterize a society or an individual in their own historical and geographical context.
  • Hunting and fishing culture
    Since the first immigrations at Thule about 4-5.000 years ago Greenland has been dependent on nature’s resources in the form of fish, birds and land and marine mammals. Hunting and especially fishing still are important as livelihood for Greenlanders and Greenlandic society. These natural conditions have led to the development of a unique culture, built upon proud traditions.

What do you know about the culture of Greenland?

What other cultures do you know?

  • Cornerstone – the dogs are a cornerstone of the Greenlandic hunting and fishing culture
    A cornerstone is part of the supporting foundation, an important precondition for or component of something. A house without a foundation tumbles down. Without frost ice becomes water; frost is a precondition for the formation of ice. The dogs transport the catch, fish and people across ice and mountains, where no other means are available.

Why are the dogs a cornerstone in this culture?

Could you be a hunter and fisher without having dogs?

  • Lifeblood – in the community/ transportation of catch and humans
    “The dogs are the lifeblood of the community where they in generation after generation have hauled the catch home to the settlement and transported people between settlements and continents,” the podcast states. Even though the dogs still play an important role, especially for tourism and the popular dog races, the snowmobile gains more and more ground.
    Lifeblood is an element that is a critical condition for something being able to function. The dogs are a condition for transporting the catch back to the settlements and towns.

What does it mean that something is the lifeblood of a community?

What is the lifeblood of your everyday life?

  • Cycle – the cycle of the game animals follows the seasonal cycle of the ice.
    A cycle is characterized by something returning more or less regularly, repeating itself.
    A calendar day has a known and fixed course. It is divided into day and night. The seasons come and go in a definite order. The ice has a cycle. The movements of the ice are influenced by cold and heat (the cycle of the seasons), which in turn influence the conditions of life for the game animals.

What are the four seasons called?
What is characteristic of the seasons where you live?

  • Tradition – the sled dogs, hunting and fishing
    The sled dogs are part of special Greenlandic traditions that granddad Niels would like to pass on to his grandchildren.

What is the difference between a working dog and a family dog?

What is a tradition, and what other traditions do you know?

  • Missing – Granddad Niels lives in Ilulissat, and his grandchild William lives in Hjørring. Granddad Niels misses his grandchild and the time when they could seek adventure and go hunting together.

William and his granddad talk together on Messenger. Do you know Messenger?

How do you talk with those you miss, or who are far away?

William misses his dogs, granddad Niels misses William. What might the dogs be missing?

The students see a map with Greenland and Denmark. Markers show where Ilulissat and Hjørring are located.

In class you can talk about:

  • How far away William and Granddad live from each other.
  • That it takes almost ten hours to travel from Hjørring in Denmark to Ilulissat in Greenland
  • Whether you know someone who lives far away.
  • How and when you visit each other.

Now the students will make their own reference book using words from the blackboard. Text as well as pictures can be inserted.

Book Creator, web version

Insert text like this:

  1. Click on +
  2. Choose Text
  3. Choose Text again
  4. Write your text
    or:
    click on the microphone and dictate your text
    (Important: choose the right language before dictating!)
  5. Finish by choosing DONE
  6. Move the text box to where you want it

Insert a picture like this:

  1. Click on +
  2. Choose Images
  3. Select a picture from your computer
    or:
    search for one on the internet, select by clicking and choose Add
  4. Resize by dragging a corner

Book Creator, app

Insert text:

  1. Tap  + 
  2. Tap Add Text
  3. Tap Text
  4. Write your text
    or:
    click on the microphone in the keyboard and dictate your text
    (Important: choose the right language before dictating!)

Insert picture:

  1. Tap  + 
  2. Tap Media (if necessary)
  3. Tap Photos
  4. Tap the one you want
  5. Resize by dragging a corner

The students may also draw their own pictures and place them on a page as described above.

The students are to take pictures of sled dogs or search for pictures of sled dogs in Greenland and insert these in the frames on the pages.

Do like this in Book Creator, web version:

  1. Click on a frame
  2. Click on the plus sign inside the selected frame
  3. Choose Images
  4. Select a picture from your computer
    or:
    search for one on the internet, select by clicking and choose Add
  5. The picture can be resized and moved

And in the Book Creator app:

  1. Search for pictures of the Greenland sled dog on the internet
  2. Save them in the camera roll
  3. Select the frame by tapping
  4. Tap the image icon
  5. Select a picture by tapping

 

The students will make their own model of a dog sledge.

Find a template in appendix 1.

When the model is finished a picture of it is inserted in the book.

See picture for inspiration:

Model made by students from the settlement school in Qassiarsuk after template in Papirklip / Kalaallit Numaat, Qiortakkat by Søren Thaae.  

The students’ task is to make a short story about their dog sledge. The story is made up of four pictures taken with the students’ iPads. These pictures will tell a small story about a dog sledge.

The pictures are to be inserted in the four frames on pages 22-23.

  1. Select a frame by tapping
  2. Tap the Camera icon
  3. Shoot your photo
  4. Choose Use Photo, and the fresh photo is inserted in the frame

Subsequently the students will make a short sound recording to each picture.

This is how to make a sound recording in Book Creator, web version:

  1. Click on +
  2. Choose Record
  3. Click on Start recording
  4. Start talking
  5. Click on Stop recording
  6. Choose USE RECORDING

And in the Book Creator app:

  1. Tap  + 
  2. Tap Media (if necessary)
  3. Tap Add Sound 
  4. Tap Start recording
  5. Start talking
  6. Tap Stop recording
  7. Choose Yes

The recording will now be represented by a small sound icon. This icon can be placed where you wish on the page. You can listen to the recording over and over again.

Here you may read the book Qimmeq which is about the Greenland sled dog. On the following pages we have selected a small part of this book for our work. We recommend that you read the text together with the class.

If you want to, you may choose further topics in the book and learn even more about the Greenland sled dog.

Read pages 6-9 aloud to the students.

In class you may talk about:

  • What makes the sled dog a special dog?
  • What do you know about sled dogs from your own life?

Subsequently the student fill out the page with what they know about sled dogs. They can write text or tell in short sound recordings.

This is how to make a sound recording in Book Creator:

  1. Click on +
  2. Choose Record
  3. Click on Start recording
  4. Start talking
  5. Click on Stop recording
  6. Choose USE RECORDING

And in the Book Creator app:

  1. Tap  + 
  2. Tap Media (if necessary)
  3. Tap Add Sound 
  4. Tap Start recording
  5. Start talking
  6. Tap Stop recording
  7. Choose Yes

At this point the students have learned a lot about sled dogs. To round off they will draw or paint their own sled dog.

The students must imagine that they have a sled dog. If they do in fact have a sled dog, this exercise can be adjusted so that they tell about their real sled dog.

When the drawing is finished, it is inserted in the book.

In class you can talk about:

  • What the sled dog is called.
  • How the relationship to the dog is.
  • What to keep in mind when close to a sled dog.
  • How a sled dog differs from a family dog.

In class you can talk about:

  • How to take care of a sled dog.
  • What a sled dog eats.
  • Where a sled dog lives.

The students present their visual stories to the class.

Make sure that the framework for feedback is positive criticism. The students should be supported in assessing what is good – and what might be done better.

Not specifically with a view to making new visual stories, but rather to let students discover and work with such constructive and positive criticism.

If you intend to work with some of the other podcasts from the Icefjord Centre, it might make sense to save the students’ Book Creator book and dog sledge so that they may be used again.

If you want the students to make use of the feedback from the class, you could reserve time for further work with the visual stories.

The podcast The Dog Lot has been created for the Icefjord Centre in Ilulissat by Katrine Nyland.

Graphics were produced by Oncotype.

Teaching material for the podcast has been developed by Lotte Brinkmann from Anholt Læringsværksted with feedback from Leg med It.

The student’s book in Book Creator has been developed as part of the project Nutaaliorta from Kivitsisa. The template was designed by Rikke Falkenberg Kofoed and Daniella Manuel, Leg med It.

The teaching material The Dog Log is published under a Creative Commons crediting licens CC:BY.

The Qimmeq project has been developed by Ilisimatusarfik and the University of Copenhagen. The children’s non-fiction book “Qimmeq – kalaallit qimmiat qimuttoq – the Greenland sled dog” was produced by Anne Katrine Gjerløff, Ilisimatusarfik and the Natural History Museum of Denmark.

The texts, assignments and pictures can be shared, reproduced and adapted, with the proviso that “The Dog Lot by the Icefjord Centre Ilulissat” is credited as the source.

PAGE BY PAGE GUIDE – THE BOOK CREATOR STUDENT’S BOOK “THE DOG LOT” 

The students meet the Icefjord Centre in two pictures, showing respectively summer and winter.

In the classroom you can talk about:

  • What the Icefjord Centre is.
  • What it looks like around the centre.
  • The difference between summer and winter.
  • How summer and winter differs where you live.

The students see a map of Greenland. A marker indicates where Ilulissat is located.

In class you can talk about:

  • What you see on the map.
  • How many people are living in Ilulissat.
  • What else you know about Greenland and Ilulissat.
  • Do you know the names of other places on the map?
  •  

The students see part of a world map. The job now is to move the red marker down to the map to show where each student lives. The marker is found in the white box and can be drawn into the map.

In class you can talk about:

  • Where your hometown is located.
  • How many people are living there.
  • Do you know the names of other places on the map?

Now it is time for the students to listen to the podcast The Dog Lot. They start the podcast by clicking on the icon in the middle of page 12.

It is recommended that they listen in pairs or small groups.

Let the students spend some minutes talking to the one next to them about what they just heard.

On page 13 the students will make short sound recordings telling about the podcast. The pictures on the page may help them remember what they heard.

This is how to make a sound recording in Book Creator, web version:

  1. Click on +
  2. Choose Record
  3. Click on Start recording
  4. Start talking
  5. Click on Stop recording
  6. Choose USE RECORDING

And in the Book Creator app:

  1. Tap  + 
  2. Tap Media (if necessary)
  3. Tap Add Sound 
  4. Tap Start recording
  5. Start talking
  6. Tap Stop recording
  7. Choose Yes

The recording will now be represented by a small sound icon. This icon can be placed where you wish on the page. You can listen to the recording over and over again.

Review in class

It is recommended to have a joint discussion in class when working with pages 12-13 is finished. We suggest that you support this with writing and maybe illustrating concepts and keywords on the blackboard. You could talk about:

  • What surprised the students when listening to the podcast.
  • Concepts and keywords that the students encountered in the podcast. You may find inspiration for the conversation below.

Concepts and keywords

  • Culture
    Culture consists of all the values, habits, traditions, knowledge and attitudes which characterize a society or an individual in their own historical and geographical context.
  • Hunting and fishing culture
    Since the first immigrations at Thule about 4-5.000 years ago Greenland has been dependent on nature’s resources in the form of fish, birds and land and marine mammals. Hunting and especially fishing still are important as livelihood for Greenlanders and Greenlandic society. These natural conditions have led to the development of a unique culture, built upon proud traditions.

What do you know about the culture of Greenland?

What other cultures do you know?

  • Cornerstone – the dogs are a cornerstone of the Greenlandic hunting and fishing culture
    A cornerstone is part of the supporting foundation, an important precondition for or component of something. A house without a foundation tumbles down. Without frost ice becomes water; frost is a precondition for the formation of ice. The dogs transport the catch, fish and people across ice and mountains, where no other means are available.

Why are the dogs a cornerstone in this culture?

Could you be a hunter and fisher without having dogs?

  • Lifeblood – in the community/ transportation of catch and humans
    “The dogs are the lifeblood of the community where they in generation after generation have hauled the catch home to the settlement and transported people between settlements and continents,” the podcast states. Even though the dogs still play an important role, especially for tourism and the popular dog races, the snowmobile gains more and more ground.
    Lifeblood is an element that is a critical condition for something being able to function. The dogs are a condition for transporting the catch back to the settlements and towns.

What does it mean that something is the lifeblood of a community?

What is the lifeblood of your everyday life?

  • Cycle – the cycle of the game animals follows the seasonal cycle of the ice.
    A cycle is characterized by something returning more or less regularly, repeating itself.
    A calendar day has a known and fixed course. It is divided into day and night. The seasons come and go in a definite order. The ice has a cycle. The movements of the ice are influenced by cold and heat (the cycle of the seasons), which in turn influence the conditions of life for the game animals.

What are the four seasons called?
What is characteristic of the seasons where you live?

  • Tradition – the sled dogs, hunting and fishing
    The sled dogs are part of special Greenlandic traditions that granddad Niels would like to pass on to his grandchildren.

What is the difference between a working dog and a family dog?

What is a tradition, and what other traditions do you know?

  • Missing – Granddad Niels lives in Ilulissat, and his grandchild William lives in Hjørring. Granddad Niels misses his grandchild and the time when they could seek adventure and go hunting together.

William and his granddad talk together on Messenger. Do you know Messenger?

How do you talk with those you miss, or who are far away?

William misses his dogs, granddad Niels misses William. What might the dogs be missing?

The students see a map with Greenland and Denmark. Markers show where Ilulissat and Hjørring are located.

In class you can talk about:

  • How far away William and Granddad live from each other.
  • That it takes almost ten hours to travel from Hjørring in Denmark to Ilulissat in Greenland
  • Whether you know someone who lives far away.
  • How and when you visit each other.

Now the students will make their own reference book using words from the blackboard. Text as well as pictures can be inserted.

Book Creator, web version

Insert text like this:

  1. Click on +
  2. Choose Text
  3. Choose Text again
  4. Write your text
    or:
    click on the microphone and dictate your text
    (Important: choose the right language before dictating!)
  5. Finish by choosing DONE
  6. Move the text box to where you want it

Insert a picture like this:

  1. Click on +
  2. Choose Images
  3. Select a picture from your computer
    or:
    search for one on the internet, select by clicking and choose Add
  4. Resize by dragging a corner

Book Creator, app

Insert text:

  1. Tap  + 
  2. Tap Add Text
  3. Tap Text
  4. Write your text
    or:
    click on the microphone in the keyboard and dictate your text
    (Important: choose the right language before dictating!)

Insert picture:

  1. Tap  + 
  2. Tap Media (if necessary)
  3. Tap Photos
  4. Tap the one you want
  5. Resize by dragging a corner

The students may also draw their own pictures and place them on a page as described above.

The students are to take pictures of sled dogs or search for pictures of sled dogs in Greenland and insert these in the frames on the pages.

Do like this in Book Creator, web version:

  1. Click on a frame
  2. Click on the plus sign inside the selected frame
  3. Choose Images
  4. Select a picture from your computer
    or:
    search for one on the internet, select by clicking and choose Add
  5. The picture can be resized and moved

And in the Book Creator app:

  1. Search for pictures of the Greenland sled dog on the internet
  2. Save them in the camera roll
  3. Select the frame by tapping
  4. Tap the image icon
  5. Select a picture by tapping

 

The students will make their own model of a dog sledge.

Find a template in appendix 1.

When the model is finished a picture of it is inserted in the book.

See picture for inspiration:

Model made by students from the settlement school in Qassiarsuk after template in Papirklip / Kalaallit Numaat, Qiortakkat by Søren Thaae.  

The students’ task is to make a short story about their dog sledge. The story is made up of four pictures taken with the students’ iPads. These pictures will tell a small story about a dog sledge.

The pictures are to be inserted in the four frames on pages 22-23.

  1. Select a frame by tapping
  2. Tap the Camera icon
  3. Shoot your photo
  4. Choose Use Photo, and the fresh photo is inserted in the frame

Subsequently the students will make a short sound recording to each picture.

This is how to make a sound recording in Book Creator, web version:

  1. Click on +
  2. Choose Record
  3. Click on Start recording
  4. Start talking
  5. Click on Stop recording
  6. Choose USE RECORDING

And in the Book Creator app:

  1. Tap  + 
  2. Tap Media (if necessary)
  3. Tap Add Sound 
  4. Tap Start recording
  5. Start talking
  6. Tap Stop recording
  7. Choose Yes

The recording will now be represented by a small sound icon. This icon can be placed where you wish on the page. You can listen to the recording over and over again.

Here you may read the book Qimmeq which is about the Greenland sled dog. On the following pages we have selected a small part of this book for our work. We recommend that you read the text together with the class.

If you want to, you may choose further topics in the book and learn even more about the Greenland sled dog.

Read pages 6-9 aloud to the students.

In class you may talk about:

  • What makes the sled dog a special dog?
  • What do you know about sled dogs from your own life?

Subsequently the student fill out the page with what they know about sled dogs. They can write text or tell in short sound recordings.

This is how to make a sound recording in Book Creator:

  1. Click on +
  2. Choose Record
  3. Click on Start recording
  4. Start talking
  5. Click on Stop recording
  6. Choose USE RECORDING

And in the Book Creator app:

  1. Tap  + 
  2. Tap Media (if necessary)
  3. Tap Add Sound 
  4. Tap Start recording
  5. Start talking
  6. Tap Stop recording
  7. Choose Yes

At this point the students have learned a lot about sled dogs. To round off they will draw or paint their own sled dog.

The students must imagine that they have a sled dog. If they do in fact have a sled dog, this exercise can be adjusted so that they tell about their real sled dog.

When the drawing is finished, it is inserted in the book.

In class you can talk about:

  • What the sled dog is called.
  • How the relationship to the dog is.
  • What to keep in mind when close to a sled dog.
  • How a sled dog differs from a family dog.

In class you can talk about:

  • How to take care of a sled dog.
  • What a sled dog eats.
  • Where a sled dog lives.

The students present their visual stories to the class.

Make sure that the framework for feedback is positive criticism. The students should be supported in assessing what is good – and what might be done better.

Not specifically with a view to making new visual stories, but rather to let students discover and work with such constructive and positive criticism.

If you intend to work with some of the other podcasts from the Icefjord Centre, it might make sense to save the students’ Book Creator book and dog sledge so that they may be used again.

If you want the students to make use of the feedback from the class, you could reserve time for further work with the visual stories.

The podcast The Dog Lot has been created for the Icefjord Centre in Ilulissat by Katrine Nyland.

Graphics were produced by Oncotype.

Teaching material for the podcast has been developed by Lotte Brinkmann from Anholt Læringsværksted with feedback from Leg med It.

The student’s book in Book Creator has been developed as part of the project Nutaaliorta from Kivitsisa. The template was designed by Rikke Falkenberg Kofoed and Daniella Manuel, Leg med It.

The teaching material The Dog Log is published under a Creative Commons crediting licens CC:BY.

The Qimmeq project has been developed by Ilisimatusarfik and the University of Copenhagen. The children’s non-fiction book “Qimmeq – kalaallit qimmiat qimuttoq – the Greenland sled dog” was produced by Anne Katrine Gjerløff, Ilisimatusarfik and the Natural History Museum of Denmark.

The texts, assignments and pictures can be shared, reproduced and adapted, with the proviso that “The Dog Lot by the Icefjord Centre Ilulissat” is credited as the source.

LISTEN TO NARRATIVES FROM LOCALS RESIDENTS FROM ILULISSAT

00:00
00:00

The dog lot

00:00
00:00

Freedom and dangers

00:00
00:00

The life-giving glacier

00:00
00:00

Life as a hunter

00:00
00:00

The town of the Greenland halibut

00:00
00:00

A 22 rifle in the shopping trolley

00:00
00:00

Life in the settlements

00:00
00:00

The treasures of a Greenlandic freezer

00:00
00:00

The light returns

CONTRIBUTORS

1. William & Niels Petersen  2. Ane Sofie & Flemming Lauritzen, Klaus Nordvig Andersen 3. Malik Niemann 4. Mikkel Petersen 5. Palle Jeremiassen, Mikkel Petersen, Lisa Helene Sap 6. William Petersen, Malik Niemann 7. Ole Dorph 8. Elin Andersen, Vera Mølgaard, Malik Niemann 9. Lisa Helene Sap

Production by Katrine Nyland & graphic artwork by Oncotype.

The project is funded by Nordea fonden.